Eating Bitter Lemons

Well, not really, but I just felt like saying it :-) Now let’s get serious: Bitter Lemons International, a Middle East roundtable, have invited me to contribute to their weekly issue, which features four different writers providing their own perspectives on a particular topic. This week’s issue focuses on blogging in the Arab World, featuring Esra’a al-Shafei, Mona Eltahawy, Ammar Abdulhamid, and myself. Read, and please let me know what you think.

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4 thoughts on “Eating Bitter Lemons

  1. First, asalam 3aleikom,

    well my freind it seems to me uve got a very good english language that i think ur not saudi, but no matter i congratulate u for this blog and do to the fact that i dissagree with u about almost every thing ..
    but one comment is u dont speak for the whole saudi society and most of us luv our king and country and very happy with what we have got. Think if we have got alqathabi the libian leader,, i wonder what ull do 5000 blogs no offence my friend.

    bestwishes,
    for ur peace of mind
    bridawiah&saudiah&proud

  2. Interesting article in Bitter Lemons. You make a very good case for the positive effects of Arab Blogs. But what are ”Arab Blogs” in your opinion? I put the question, because in my view the article would have been even more interesting had you differentiated between a) English-language blogs posted by Arabs in the Middle East b) same as a) but living in the West, and c) Arabic-language blogs posted by Arabs in the Middle East. I would suggest category a) has some influence in the upper reaches of modern Arab societies, but not that much because the local audience is very small indeed. The international audience of this category is proportionately much greater,and indeed this ever-expanding and much-reported group has come to be viewed -fallaciously- as being identical to ”the Arab Blogosphere”. I would not discount category b) but the greater freedom this category enjoys may be off-set by being somewhat out of touch. Would you not say that in terms of effecting positive change, category c) has much the largest potential (as well as being the most under-reported) of the three?

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