Mohammed bin Nayef Escapes Assassination Attempt

Saudi Arabia was rudely awaken to some very disturbing news last night. A wanted terrorist blew himself up in an attempt to assassinate Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, the assistant interior minister who has been spearheading the country’s war on terror. The Prince escaped with minor injuries, and was treated in a hospital, where he was visited later by King Abdullah. Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, claimed the assassination attempt.

This is the first known assassination attempt against a senior member of the royal family since 1975, when King Faisal was killed, and it could be a pivotal point in Saudi Arabia’s antiterrorism efforts. I’m truly glad that Prince was not hurt. I just hope that this incident won’t be used as a fuel to the already raging debate battle between conservatives and liberals in the country. This is a time for solidarity and national unity, let us not ruin it.

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33 thoughts on “Mohammed bin Nayef Escapes Assassination Attempt

  1. Such violence and any appeals to violence are truly horrible and evil.

    I hope that the security and police protecting him and all others is intensifyed.

    I hope that gendarmes are required to focus attention on the security of governmental leaders, rather than on silly items such as afro hairstyles by youth.

    Such violence must be condemned absolutely and by all members of our nation.

    We can and must do better.

  2. Terrorism and abuse of Islam to do it should be a point of solidarity between liberals and conservatives. I hope it does work out to be so, and that this is not an opening salvo in an escalation of violence.

    I agree with Andrew that police and security forces would be better to direct their efforts toward prevention of such acts, and leave the afros alone.

  3. As far as I know, Mohammed was the closest of royals to the radicals as he has pardoned and even supported those who confessed and promised to go back to normal life. Giving them jobs, money and even arranged their marraiges.
    I hope this accident will change his easy policy for dealing with the radicals.

    • If you are referring in part to the psychiatry rehabilitation program for terrorists run by Dr. Turki Mohammad, it is deemed a highly effective program. For rehabilitation to be effectively maintained the person must have social supports to reintegrate into society without being left to lapse into old ways. In Saudi this means not only jobs, but money for marriage and helping with arranged marriages.

      • Too right Chiara,

        Recidivism in this case in KSA should be incredibly low because of those supports and I think that any person who was given that much support, as well as a second shot at a new life would be hesitant to reoffend. In a society where honor is so valued, I would assume that a man wouldn’t risk it a 2nd time.

  4. Those who choose to live by the sword will surely die by it – and no sentiment is justified. They have a long hand and need to be lucky only once – the receipient every time. This is an opportunity for those charged with dispensing justice and fairness to all in the kingdom to seriously reflect on their conduct and decisions.

  5. Good luck next time.

    It couldn’t have happen to a more deserving bunch.

    You you reap what you sow.
    What Goes Around Comes Around.

  6. True, if u live by the sword…… I truly have lost love and respect for the Princes (Once I would have defended them with my life if need be), but the truth always surfaces, masha’allah… As true Islam keeps on dieing, and the Shaytan keeps sneaking into the “ummah” so will more of us “radicals, exxtremists, and so and so” turn to these “criminal acts”, I wonder who are the worst, the rich powerful who embrace the filthy lifestyles of the Kuffar or those who will do anyhting to bring back the rule of Allah and his Messenger? and who will be forgiven in the hereafter LOL… Allah Akbar, and may the King live long and healthy

  7. I hope that those who use strong descriptions of non-believers are more moderate in their language.

    It was the Arab nation that preserved the works of many non-believers, such as Platon, Hesiode, and others.

    In addition, impurity and corruption also exists in nations in which there are many believers.

    As such, I would suggest forbearance in describing non-believers as filthy.

    Moreover, I believe that theological appeals to hatred betray the spirit of the Rasulullah.

    Many Sufi writers describe the toleration and peaceability that characterise the true path of the believer.

    These merit greater attention.

  8. Ahmed
    I really hate your concept of ‘filthy lifestyles of the kuffar’.
    Now please restrict your focus on the arab or muslim world, and keep your dirty mind off my world.

  9. True Islam does respect all religions and faiths. Radical Muslims and terrorists only represent a deep psychological problems in our society. With no true leadership, I see no hope for our future. May God have mercy on

  10. I’m glad the prince wasn’t badly injured.

    The reaction to this very small incident in SA seems out of proportion, considering how much more the Iraqis have suffered from terrorism, much of it imported from SA.

  11. “True Islam does respect all religions and faiths.”

    If so, must “True Islam” not also respect those that denigrate Islam as part of their religious belief, and even compensate individuals and communities who suffer at the hands of Muslims not so enlightened?

  12. Solomon2

    I believe there to be an element of hyperbole in the statement by Mohamd:

    “True Islam does respect all religions and faiths.”

    While the statement is generally true, true islam does not respect the faith of those who worship evil, including the evil of senseless violence.

    I would offer the view, as well, that compensation, if what is meant is monetairy compensation, need not be an obligation of those who truly follow the Rasulullah.

    However, it is and must be the path of true followers of the Rasulullah to condemn all senselessness and unnecessary violence.

    The goal of religion should be to promote peace and toleration of others.

    Respect, however, must be merited, and clearly a religion that itself worships evil, as one example, does not merit respect.

    Thus, I largely agree with Mohamd, but not unreservedly.

  13. ” If not one thing it’s the other” explains part of the situation here in the magic kingdom. If not the West it’s the East if not it is the government and if not it is Saudi’s who are not enlightened and don’t exactly follow their interpretation of Islam. I believe there is so much steam has been building up for decades that is causing all this violence. Saudi society is no longer enough to vent this pressure and it’s turn of Western government first and now our own. Abu Ala’la Al Mua’rai an Arabic philosopher said something like this” They recited verses of Quran and then they drawn their swords and said we are correct and we agreed”

  14. “true islam does not respect the faith of those who worship evil, including the evil of senseless violence.”

    That leaves a lot of room for interpretation, doesn’t it?

    “I would offer the view, as well, that compensation, if what is meant is monetairy compensation, need not be an obligation of those who truly follow the Rasulullah.”

    So “True Muslims” are permitted to benefit materially (through trade) and spiritually (by reveling at successful religious conquest) through the acts of non-“True” Muslims? Vocal condemnation (“lip service”) is all that is required? There is no obligation for doing justice to the victims of non-“True” Muslims?

    These seem like very large “reservations”.

  15. Solomon2 :

    To your questions:

    “That leaves a lot of room for interpretation, doesn’t it?”

    Of course. What is required of humans is to exercise reasonable and rational judgments.

    Interpretation is one such form of judgment.

    “So “True Muslims” are permitted to benefit materially (through trade) and spiritually (by reveling at successful religious conquest) through the acts of non-”True” Muslims?”

    Yes, of course. Just as Protestant Christians are permitted to benefit through trade with those whom they do not view as True Christans, such as Mormon Christians. And, just as Protestant Christians may revel at succesful conversion by Russian Orthodox Christians.

    “Vocal condemnation (”lip service”) is all that is required? There is no obligation for doing justice to the victims of non-”True” Muslims?”

    No, just as there is no duty by Buddhists to provide monetary compensation to the victims of the Aum Shinrikyo group’s crimes.

    I believe that criminal justice enforcement must be exclusively performed by government, rather than by religious groups.

    It is not the duty, therefore, for followers of Islam to provide monetary compensation for the actions of every deranged fanatic who assertedly acts in the name of the Rasulullah.

    It is for the government to mete punishment and temporal justice.

    These are not reservations at all.

    It is a matter of principle for me and many others that governments are to be the exclusive providers of criminal punishment.

    I recognise that there are others who would prefer that such punishment be meted by religious courts.

  16. “What is required of humans is to exercise reasonable and rational judgments.”

    How can these occur if humans are subjected exclusively to misinformation? How can one search for the truth in a country where even archaeology is subject to censorship?

    “Just as Protestant Christians are permitted to benefit through trade with those whom they do not view as True Christans…”

    But these groups today don’t have sectarian blood on their hands, and don’t revel in hegemonic religious war.

    “just as there is no duty by Buddhists to provide monetary compensation to the victims of the Aum Shinrikyo group’s crimes.”

    Aum Shirinikyo are Buddhists? Never thought of them that way.

    “I believe that criminal justice enforcement must be exclusively performed by government, rather than by religious groups.”

    Enforcement is for the government. Pity and charity is for the individual and community, is that not so?

  17. Solomon2:

    You ask:

    “How can these [reasonable and rational judgments] occur if humans are subjected exclusively to misinformation? How can one search for the truth in a country where even archaeology is subject to censorship?”

    Humans everywhere are subjected o misinformation. Surely it is true that in the West there is misinformation about Arab lands.

    As to how one can search for truth in our country, I would offer the thought that the internet has greatly facilitated this.

    You state:

    “But these groups today don’t have sectarian blood on their hands, and don’t revel in hegemonic religious war.”

    Alas, the residents of Northern Ireland may not agree with the assessment that there are no Christians today that have sectarian blood on their hands.

    You asked:

    “There is no obligation for doing justice to the victims of non-”True” Muslims?”

    I replied:

    “I believe that criminal justice enforcement must be exclusively performed by government, rather than by religious groups.”

    You then asked:

    “Enforcement is for the government. Pity and charity is for the individual and community, is that not so?”

    Pity is for the individual, charity is for the individual, the community and the government.

    However, I would assert that pity and charity are distinct from meting justice to victims of violence.

    Such temporal justice must be the exclusive role of government.

  18. Andrew, you are describing a society without civic-mindedness, of lords and subjects, not citizens. Fatalism in government which leads to rule-by-law, rather than rule-of-law. If your opinions are widespread, it explains many of the ills of the Islamic World.

    In my opinion, these issues are cultural and political, rather than religious and may change for the better with increased democratization.

  19. “a society without civic-mindedness, of lords and subjects, not citizens.”

    Forsooth!

    I describe a society in which “charity is for the individual, the community and the government. ”

    If charity is provided by individuals, the community and the government, then in your view that is a society without civic-mindedmness.

    And, I disagree with your description of “many of the ills of the Islamic World.”

    I live here, after all, in my nation.

    What is this Islamic World of which you speak?

    Majority Muslim countries are all different, with some having had women as governmental leaders, while others assign few if any governmental roles to women.

    In which of these countries have you lived, would be a retort.

    I reject the broad generalizations that I hear from Westerners that there is an Islamic World, and that facile characterizations can be used to describe it.

    Why do I not hear similar description of the Christian World, and generalizations that South Korea and Ireland are somehow alike because they each have a Christian plurality?

    The description of fatalism as being tied to Islam is the type of stereotype with which I will not deal.

    And, to suggest that my views are fatalistic is risible.

    Enough of this nonsense.

  20. Excellent points, well-stated!
    Hark!
    I might add that the USA lags noticeably in % of women in government, as does Canada, although we did have a female Prime Minister, Kim Campbell, who took the fall for her predecessor, Brian Mulroney’s bungling.

  21. Aoa, I am Khurram Masood from Pakistan but living in Dammam, KSA. I wish that Prince Mohammed Bin Nayef will be very fine now. My father Major Masood Ahmed had a meeting with Prince Nayef in late 1970s and they both went for hunting near the Indian Border. Accidently, Prince Nayef crossed the indian border but my father helped him and saved him from there. my father is giving Salaam to the Prince Nayef and his son Price Mohammed. Please convey my message to both princes and ask them to give their direct number to let my father talk to them. My father and obth the princes will be very happy in talking with each other. My mobile number in Dammam is 0568168972 and my home number in Pakistan is 0092-51-5503383.
    Regards,
    Khurram

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